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128 Records Found matching query: Trevor Sorbie     Record(s): 1 - 3

Trevor Sorbie


This is the conundrum that is Trevor Sorbie, born in Paisley in 1949, the son and grandson of barbers, who dropped out of school at 15 and who dreamed of becoming a famous artist.On the one hand, he is revered by his peers in the international hairdressing and fashion scene as probably the greatest hairdresser in the world. Since the early 1970s, w...



Sarah asks:
I have naturally dark blonde/ mousy but looks darker lately hair and have had several blending tones of blonde in it for years now. It regularly trimmed and in good condition, however I feel washed out lately and have always wanted a more dramatic look and fancy having my hair dyed a warm/ chocolate brown. I have fair pinky cheeks skin, and hazel brown eyes. Can you advise me if dying my hair brown would suit me, and what shade would be best. I am finding it really hard to get good advice on this matter. I am mid thirties but look young, and have long hair. I want to look my best. Please help.

Trevor SorbieAnswered By:
Trevor Sorbie
I would really recommend advice from a professional colourist and a treatment at the salon as what you want is technically quite difficult and I would not advise you to try to do this at home. It is worth saving up for professional help that way you are assured your hair will look its best.





Ellie asks:
I have very thick light brown/dark blonde shoulder length hair which is quite wavy, but does not look good naturally, so I either mousse or straighten it. However, it always goes rather wavy towards the end of the day. How can I keep the style through the day? I have had blonde highlights, which I like, and now I would like to dye it a medium blonde colour. Would this look ok? Is there anything else I could do to my hair?

Trevor SorbieAnswered By:
Trevor Sorbie
Dear Judith:
It could be different causes why your hair its going green, generally blonde hair can show ''acid'' colours easier than darker colours, that is because hair its absorbent and absorbs minerals and salts from the water like it could be chlorine or copper oxide. To remove this, you need to get liquid 30 volumes peroxide and soak the hair with it and watch it till disappear, then apply it to the hair and finish it with a clarifying shampoo cover this one with a plastic cap and bake it under the dryer for about 15 minutes, condition and treat the hair.
Trevor







Marion asks:
I had some low lights about 2 months ago that reacted with a henna colour I had put in my hair ( I did not realise this would happen) so the hairdresser put an all over colour on to cover up the green. This has now faded and I am left with a thick band of greenish tinge at the back of my head. I have spent the last couple of years growing my hair and do not want to have it cut short again. The salon did a strand test to see if I could have another colour but it reacted badly. They said my hair would be worse. Please help! Is there anything I can do to neutralise the green or that I can use to cover it. It is also now really dry (my hair is naturally dry and wavy anyway so this is a nightmare!) I am now tying my hair back in a ponytail every day to disguise the problem.

Trevor SorbieAnswered By:
Trevor Sorbie
Henna is a progressive dye that stays in the hair until it grows out, even if it looks as if it has completely faded. There is nothing you can do but use lots of conditioning treatments and gradually have the henna coloured hair cut off. Because of this problem I never recommend clients to use Henna on their hair at home.





 
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