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1548 Records Found matching query: thin     Record(s): 13 - 15
Akshu asks:
I am 21 years old.I have a medium length ,wavy and almost thin hair. I just put a pony tail or plait my hair rarely. I am having this hair style from past 10 years. I am scared to go in for layer cut because I feel that they may make my hair look even thinner.But I am bored of my hair style.Kindly suggest me something different so that I donít lose my hair density and length .

Mark WoolleyAnswered By:
Mark Woolley
Hello,

When thinking about layers, they tend to give more volume at the root, as the hair is cut shorter and lighter - this then makes the ends thinner so wouldnít be the best option for you if your hair is quite thin.
The best way to create thicker looking hair is to have the ends cut quite bluntly, with the back slightly shorter than the front to make the hair fall forwards and create the illusion of thicker and longer hair.
Graduation builds weight which will in turn make your hair look thicker.
At the moment, blunt cut long bobs are really popular, especially those that are all one length - taking into consideration your face shape and the way your hair falls, this could be a great option for you.





E Jones asks:
I have naturally blonde red hair which is unusually fine and not very thick. It is poker straight and sits flat even after blow drying with volume boosters and using straighteners at the roots to provide lift - also wind moisture etc totally flattens it out again. I use to have a great hair stylist who managed to cut a shape into my hair which meant it didnít flatten within two hours (it lasted all day even in poor weather) and still held its shape when I went for my next eight week cut - however this stylist left the salon and they wonít tell me where she went! I have tried to explain to at least six different stylists at various country wide salons who charge a lot for a cut (which I am happy to pay if I get a good cut) that my hair needs shape cutting in - what term should I use. My old stylist use to "thin" my hair which gave more ummph - when I tell them this they use those texurising scissors on the layer ends which just makes it flyaway and this doesnít give any lift or volume. Also after two weeks itís sitting flat to my head again! Could you please tell me what technique I should be asking for - as the "senior" stylists I have come across appear to have a total lack of understanding/knowledge on how to cut my type of hair - I canít believe Iím the only one! My hair use to be jaw length and cut up into the back to provide bulk and we would alter the longish fringe to the side depending on the mood and or define layers around the face - as styles changed. I am getting really desperate as I am a 43 yr old who can not afford to look like a drowned rat or disaffected teenager! Please help!!

Gary SunderlandAnswered By:
Gary Sunderland
I wish I could tell you that this was the first time I have heard this, but it could not be further from the truth.

Under no circumstances let a stylist attack your hair with texturising/thinning shears, it will make your hair FLAT and FRIZZY. ...More >

You will definitely get the best results with a soft razoring technique "internal diffusion" which gives you soft supporting volume to prolong the volume and lift you need.

In all my years this is the only technique that truly works.

Please ensure you use a very experienced stylist competent in this technique, as in the wrong hands it will result in your hair been thinner and flatter.

Good luck







Natalie asks:
I have had alopecia areata for about 12 years now. My hair falls out in patches and then grows back course frizzy with a curl in. It is very hard to style as it stands out from the rest of my hair. I straighten it every day which is causing it to look dry. I use Tigi shampoo and conditioner for coloured hair but am finding it is making my roots greasy. How can I look after my hair? What products do you suggest? I love my hair otherwise but these unruly patches of hair are making it difficult to maintain. Your advice is much appreciated

Tony MaleedyAnswered By:
Tony Maleedy
It sounds like you have accepted that you have to live with the alopecia areata and have give up trying to do something about it, and I would not if I were you. When I was in clinical practice I saw many hundreds of people with AA and almost all of them regained their hair .... sooner or later. ...More >

Alopecia areata (area) is a relatively common, but highly unpredictable, auto-immune disorder of the hair follicles, affecting approximately 1.7% of the population in the UK.

In alopecia areata, the affected hair follicles are mistakenly attacked by a personís own immune system (white blood cells), resulting in the arrest of the hair growth stage. Alopecia areata usually starts with one or more small, round, smooth bald patches on the scalp. Occasionally, it progresses to affect the total scalp hair loss (alopecia totalis).

Alopecia areata occurs in males and females of all ages and races; however, onset most often begins in childhood. Although not life-threatening, alopecia areata is most certainly life-altering, and its sudden onset, recurrent episodes, and unpredictable course have a profound psychological impact on the lives of those disrupted by this disease.

In an unaffected person 90% of the hair follicles are in the active, or hair producing, phase of the hair cycle (which lasts on average between 3 and 6 years), and 10% in the resting phase (which lasts about 3 months). In cases of alopecia areata all the hair follicles in a particular area are thrown from their active phase into their dormant phase were the hair falls out and the follicle rests for a time. But rather than the normal 3 months it can be 6 or 12 months or even several years. The one saving grace of alopecia areata is that the hair follicles never die. This is very important because as they are only dormant they can, and usually do, start producing hair again at some point.

Stress, shock, anxiety are all common causes of alopecia areata. Any of these can act as a triggering factor which starts the problem off and then, because of the stress the loss of hair can cause the disorder continuities even thought the initial causative factor has disappeared, so one is left with a viscous and perpetual cycle.

Because the hair is capable of growing given the right circumstances, it is a question of finding out what they are. Reducing any stress causing factor will help, and ensuring that the diet is good is very important (see feeding your hair information sheet).

There are a number of treatments which can be helpful. Minoxidil (trade name, Regaine) has been shown to stimulate the regrowth of hair in some people. This is available from Boots and other chemists (use the extra strength formula). A standard form of treatment in trichology clinics is exposure to concentrated ultra-violet radiation in order to cause a marked erythema. This treatment can be very successful if carried out over a period of a few weeks.

You should also consider consulting a qualified trichologist. The Institute of Trichologists will give you a list of people in your area. Tel: 08706 070602





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