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616 Records Found matching query: thick hair     Record(s): 46 - 48
Kyle asks:
My hair is exceptionally thick, falls in loose spirals, and comes down to the middle of my shoulder blades. I have been growing my hair out for the past couple of years, and I never had a problem with frizz until my hair approached shoulder length.

I immediately started using moisturizing shampoos and conditioners, letting my hair air dry, and shampooing every other day instead of daily, but it has only been getting worse. I tried a ridiculous number of hair products to see if I could style away the frizz, but the only thing that worked 100% was to straighten my hair.

I have since found some products I am happy with, but they are not able to control the frizz completely. I use Frizz-Ease shampoo and conditioner for curly hair, a deep conditioner as needed, and Frizz-Ease volume reducer for control. I do not care for serums, but I use them if I am going to be in the sun for a while.

I really do not want to straighten my hair or cut it shorter, so what can I do?

Diana DudasAnswered By:
Diana Dudas
I would suggest using a clarifying shampoo and removing all product build up and starting form scratch. Check that the anti frizz products you are using do not contain silicone as this can cause the product build up. The use good moisturizing shampoos and conditioners that contain humectants such as coconut oil. And use a good moisturizing styling lotion to keep the curls defined





Madhuchandru asks:
I want to have thick hair day by day I am losing my thickness as there is nobody in our family has baldness or hereditary evidence I am very concerned

Tony MaleedyAnswered By:
Tony Maleedy
There are many reasons why we lose hair, it could be linked to your health, diet or stress levels, and it could still be hereditary. Genetic hair loss patterns can skip two or three generations so even if your parents or even your grandparents have no hair loss problems it is still possible to inherit a hair thinning condition from a great grandparent. It would be a good idea for you to consult a Trichologist to try to establish the cause of your thinning hair. They may also be able to reduce or stop the problem. Call the Institute of Trichologists on 08706 070602 for your nearest practitioner.







Kathy asks:
I am 47 years old and have always had a very wavy thick head of hair. About a year and a half ago my hair suddenly began to change and has become thin in its diameter, has lost its elasticity,is very dry and seems to fall out more easily. I do colour my hair and my hairdresser has said that my natural color is now very white. I am wondering if there is any connection to suddenly going white due to stress or could this be a premenopausal result? I miss my hair....is there any hope to restoring it back to its old condition?

Tony MaleedyAnswered By:
Tony Maleedy
It sounds like you would need some TCL after receiving such a very poor response to your question. I apologise for not being able to give you a proper answer sooner but I have been away on business for some time. ...More >

In asking your question you mention two things that can have a negative effect on hair, stress and the menopause. It is highly unlikely that you will experience any hair loss prior to any hormonal changes occurring but when the level of oestrogen begins to reduce then excessive hair loss is extremely common. In most women this hair loss is classed as temporary and reversible and most of the hair that falls out due to the disruption caused by the fall in oestrogen will be replaced - but this takes time. When a hair falls from the scalp the hair follicle goes into a resting phase, this is perfectly normal and will last for approximately three months, only after that will a new hair start to grow and then at a rate of 2-3cm per month, so it takes some time for the hair to fully recover.

In women with a genetic predisposition to thinning hair the hair can respond badly to the fall in the level of oestrogen and never really recover fully. Many women find that HRT has a positive effect on their hair because the it can raise the level of oestrogen and stimulate hair growth. If you think the menopause could be starting in your case you could talk to your GP about this.

Another very common cause of hair loss is stress, and it can affect anyone. Stress commonly accelerates the hair growth cycle, shortening the growing phase of the hair so it falls out faster. The old hair will be replaced but, for example, if a hair falls out after growing for only two years rather than, say, four or five which may be your normal growth period, and this is affecting virtually all the hair on your head then the overall effect can be dramatic.

This type of hair loss generally stops when the causative stress factor has disappeared, but good ways of helping your body deal with stress and reducing the negative effects it can have on your hair are to get plenty of exercise (no need for a gym, long brisk walks will do it) as this burns up adrenaline and testosterone (yes, women have it too). It is also a good idea to make sure your diet is well-balanced with plenty of fruit, vegetables proteins, water etc. Also ensure that you are getting the quantity of sleep you think your body needs.

Finally, if the problem continues you should go to see a qualified trichologist to let them try to find out the exact cause of the problem and advise you what to do about it. The Institute of Trichologists will give you a list of people in your area. Tel: 08706 070602

I hope that, this time, the answer was helpful.





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